PLASA 2019: Artistic Licence ‘skinny’ range
Tuesday, 10 September 2019
artisticrackSplit octo is the first product in the new ‘skinny rack’ range
UK - At PLASA 2019, Artistic Licence will be launching rackSplit octo, the first product in its new ‘skinny rack’ range. Designed for a standard 19” rack but only 50mm deep, the product - an 8-output DMX/RDM opto-splitter with Neutrik XLR5 outputs - packs premium functionality into an impressively compact form factor. Visitors are invited to view rackSplit octo in the PLASA Awards for Innovation gallery and on Stand C32.
rackSplit octo is a budget-friendly 1U rack-mount DMX/RDM opto-splitter. rackSplit octo heralds the new ‘skinny rack’ range from Artistic Licence, which also currently comprises a gateway (rackLynx octo). Its metal enclosure is a mere 50mm deep, allowing products to be doubled up (front and back) in touring racks for maximum packing density. Alternatively, the splitter is great for space-saving on wall mounted 1U racks.
The product features an optically isolated input and 8 Neutrik XLR5 outputs which are electrically protected from transients. rackSplit octo is also equipped with the unique Artistic Licence 'data fix' mode, for use in situations with problematic fixtures that do not implement DMX/RDM correctly.
The electrical (transient) protection on the outputs guards against both static electricity and LED power supply faults or mis-wires. The input is optically isolated from the outputs and mains earth. This isolation offers protection from potentially dangerous high voltage accidents. Also it can eliminate potential earth/ground differential issues as the input is not electrically connected to any of the outputs.
One of the major advantages of the product compared to others on the market is that it can be transitioned into ‘data-fix’ mode with a simple slide switch on the front. This is an incredibly useful feature for situations where intra-manufacturer compatibility issues may be causing flicker. In data-fix mode, rackSplit octo discards all RDM and other specialist data packets. It also adjusts the DMX timing to values that are likely to be acceptable to fixtures that do not fully comply with the DMX standard.
(Jim Evans)

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