Limited Edition Mixer from Stanton
Wednesday, 16 May 2001

Stanton will introduce another world first this month when it begins shipping the SK-2F Limited Edition mixer. Available in the UK through exclusive distributors, Lamba plc, the SK-2F Limited Edition is an upgraded version of the SK-2F. Upgrades include the latest generation of the Focus fader (V2.0) which is a digital optical crossfader, and the OS2 optical scratch switch. The SK-2F is the first mixer to utilize this technology, which will enable DJs around the world to push the boundaries of what can be achieved with two turntables and a DJ mixer.

Improving on the original, and world’s first optical fader design, the Focus Fader V2 is truly curve-adjustable to accommodate any style of turntable artist. Fitted with an array of optical sensors, and microprocessor-controlled to eliminate the need for contacts or graphite material, V2 will outlast many standard graphite or conductive plastic faders on the market - which is why it comes with a limited lifetime warranty. The OS2 also represents a Stanton innovation in its mechanical properties, since it is the first phono/line switch which features a fader as the user interface. This will allow the same hand/wrist movement to be executed when using the crossfader and OS2, which in turn translates into efficiency in scratching performance. The flat handle and soft slide action of the OS2 makes it easy to perform any existing techniques, including the Crab Scratch. The small travel and slide motion will be a positive tool in conditioning the hand/wrist movements to be more minute and precise.

Allen & Heath at Club Yellow
Tuesday, 15 May 2001

Two Allen & Heath mixers, the ML5000 and Xone:464, have recently found a home in top Japanese venue Club Yellow. The club hosts a variety of nights, from hard house to soul. Mr Kikuchi, sound manger at Yellow, explained what they were looking for: "We needed a top quality mixer for live mixing and overall control of sound at the club. The ML5000 provided this, at a great price." The 32-channel version of the ML5000 dual function FOH/monitor mixer met his requirements, due to the flexibility provided by its 16 auxes, eight audio groups and eight VCA groups. In addition to the ML5000, Yellow also needed a dedicated DJ mixer for its prominent house, techno and garage nights. The Allen & Heath Xone:464 was chosen and has so far found great favour. Naoko Sugano of Onkyo Tokki, the company that supplied the mixers, believes that the choice of new DJ console at the venue was determined by quality and price for a product that needed to be instantly accessible to any visiting DJ.

 
 
Mike Lowe Leaves ETC
Tuesday, 15 May 2001

ETC Europe has announced today that Mike Lowe will be retiring from the position of managing director at the end of May. Lowe has been instrumental in the continuing expansion of ETC Europe and has been intimately involved in developing the European markets for ETC. As part of the ongoing international expansion of ETC, improvements to operations are taking place to further leverage the extensive resources available in its network of offices worldwide. Bill Gallinghouse, vice-president of business development, assumes responsibility for European sales, and Dick Titus, chief operating officer, assumes responsibility for leading ETC Europe operations. ETC's European offices will remain in London and the company will continue serving its clients with the support of its dealer and distributor network.

 
Stanton’s Latest Turntable
Tuesday, 15 May 2001

Stanton has released the latest in its line of professional straight tone arm turntables. Available in the UK through exclusive distributors Lamba plc, the STR8-100 features Stanton¹s highest torque direct drive motor to date, as well as many features favoured by today’s professional DJs.

Like all the STR8 Series turntables, the STR8-100 comes with a straight tone arm, which virtually eliminates skipping. It features digital output (SP/DIF) which allows the DJ to plug the turntable into a computer and sample away. The Key Adjust (Master Tempo) keeps the pitch at zero, while the platter speed is changed using the pitch fader. There is also a Line Input Master, a built-in 3.5mm input jack allowing portable CD, MD or MP-3 to be plugged directly into the body of the turntable. Other features include in the STR8-100 include a reverse switch (allowing back-spinning), selectable pitch adjustment (up to ±25%), selectable speeds (33, 45, 78rpm), brushed aluminium chassis and aluminium platter, height adjustable tone arm and adjustable feet, blue LEDs and blue strobe indicator, target light and a free slip mat.

 
 
Beacon of Light
Tuesday, 15 May 2001

When the switch was flicked on the impressive 400ft high St John’s Beacon tower in Liverpool, it was a bold, dramatic statement to mark the first phase of an ambitious City of Light project being undertaken by the Liverpool Vision organisation.

City of Light is a long-term plan to architecturally light several important landmarks in Liverpool, and is scheduled to unfold over the next five to seven years. St John’s Beacon lies at the heart of Liverpool: its elegant form is one of the most distinctive shapes on the skyline.

Lee Forde, the lighting designer for the project, chose 10 Studio Due City Beam luminaires - supplied to Slough-based Stagetec by Studio Due’s UK distributor Coe-tech. Stagetec also designed and installed the lights and a custom-designed interactive control system, based on radio DMX links and operation via a telephone handset, for the St John’s Beacon illuminations.

The City Beam fixtures themselves are surrounded by vandal-proof cages and situated discreetly on various buildings around the foot of the tower, including St John’s Market and G. H. Lee’s store, the latter being custom-coloured to match the building. Forde chose MSD 1200W light sources for the fixtures - one of three bulb options. The City Beam’s focus facilities also came in handy, with six fixtures shooting up from the base area of the tower and a smaller circle of four located further up. The latter had a tighter focus, dovetailing into the tower as it narrows before reaching its summit.

Since data cabling was totally impractical, Stagete

 
Bandit Promotes Dickmann
Tuesday, 15 May 2001

Bandit Lites Inc has promoted Ben Dickmann to the role of director of marketing. Dickmann joined Bandit Lites in June 2000 as a marketing associate and quickly developed the company’s marketing efforts. He is a graduate of Valparaiso University with a BSBA in Marketing.

 
 
Direct Lighting & Lighting Technology
Tuesday, 15 May 2001

New Malden, Surrey is the new home for Direct Lighting, the latest addition to the Lighting Technology Group of companies. Established over 10 years and under the leadership of directors Ian Moodie and Steve Copping, Direct Lighting is well-known in the industry for the distribution of light sources and related products to independent retailers and commercial end users. The company is already networked to take full advantage of the Group's new National Distribution Centre in Corby where a new computerised internal order processing system has been installed to mastermind and speed up deliveries to its customers. The new address for Direct Lighting is: 4 Shannon Commercial Centre, Beverley Way, New Malden, Surrey, KT3 4PT, UK.

 
Martin Goes Big at Eurovision
Tuesday, 15 May 2001

The 46th Eurovision Song Contest at Denmark’s national stadium, Parken, featured one of the largest automated lighting rigs ever assembled for a single show. Danish lighting rental company SeeLite A/S, who recently took over Martin Danmark’s rental division, supplied all the lighting for Eurovision 2001 (subhired through rental company ProCon of Germany). The package included nearly 900 automated, computer-controlled fixtures including over 700 of Martin’s most successful and popular lights, MAC luminaries. The massive rig also included over 1000 conventional luminaries - all in all a 4.2 million watt lighting system. The Eurovision Song Contest has featured Martin lighting for the past several years, including in Israel in 1999 and Sweden in 2000. By comparison, last year’s Eurovision show in Stockholm incorporated just 300 computer-controlled fixtures. Set-up began a full two weeks before the event.

The lighting design was by SeeLite’s Lars Nissen. With a mandate to produce a show that was bigger than last year’s, and with a large 38,000 seat stadium to fill with atmospheric effects, Lars incorporated a massive amount of Martin automated lighting into the designs. The Eurovision stage itself was enormous; a large and open platform surrounded by several video and projection screens with back light and projection provided by MAC 2000s. Lars placed 78 Martin Atomic 3000 strobes on the projection and video screen truss to the back of the stage for powerful white flash effects. Truss arms hang straight down from the ceiling with pods of M

 
 
Ridella Joins High End Systems Sales Team
Tuesday, 15 May 2001

Al Ridella has joined automated lighting manufacturer High End Systems in the role of Northeast Region Sales Manager, and is now based in High End's New York City office. The industry veteran's resume includes years of experience at a number of familiar companies. Most recently he was production coordinator at Fourth Phase New Jersey. His career began straight out of college with Strand. From there he moved to Vanco as head of electronics, then to Bash Theatrical where he handled systems sales. That led to a rental coordinatorjob at Production Arts, then finally to PRG (whose name changed to Fourth Phase while he was there). "High End Systems is a good company," Ridella says. "They take care of their people and customers, and they make good products. I look forward to working with High End's authorized resellers in the Northeast territory."

 
TOA Calls the Tuna
Monday, 14 May 2001

Hull-based public address specialists, Galloway Electronics, proved the power of an effective website this month when they completed a contract for Indian Ocean Tuna - a subsidiary of Heinz - in the Seychelles. "I turned on the computer one morning and there was the enquiry posted on our website," confesses finance director Brian Galloway. "We had just started to export, and a job right in the middle of the Indian Ocean couldn’t have provided us with a better start." The family-owned business has been operating for 20 years, and for much of that time the company has been dealing with TOA Electronics, and fitting their public address, voice evacuation and CCTV systems as approved installers. Thus when the canning factory stated that they needed a factory-wide public address system, Galloway didn't have to look further than the TOA catalogue.

Indian Ocean Tuna faxed through drawings and Galloway Electronics put together a design based around a TOA drive rack, for final installation by local contractors. The six-zone system - some featuring music, some voice only - will provide total coverage into all the food preparation, store room, staff room and administration blocks, the TOA direct horn speakers powered from a single TOA V Series amp rack situated in the administration block. The paging includes a 10-zone individual mic system, with an all-call and music restoration facility throughout.

 
 
Steve Terry Leaves PRG to Join ETC
Monday, 14 May 2001

Steve Terry, president of the Fourth Phase Systems Group, will leave the company on May 25th. Terry, one of the original owners of Production Arts, which was acquired by PRG in June 1998, is departing to assume the role of vice-president of professional services at Electronic Theatre Controls (ETC). In that role, he will be able to utilize his skills and experience on a much more diverse range of projects and will work closely with Bill McGivern, director of systems, and Sarah Spencer, director of technical services, to further strengthen ETC's industry-leading position in those areas.

Industry veteran Bill Groener will become the Northeast Regional VP for the PRG companies and will assume responsibility for lighting and audio rentals, large format projection (rentals and sales) and all permanent installation projects. Groener has been with PRG since 1998 and brings extensive experience from his prior roles with Disney, Strand and Barbizon over and above his recent efforts as vice-president of the Fourth Phase Systems Group. http://www.fourthphase.com

 
LT Series from Crest
Monday, 14 May 2001

Crest Audio’s new LT Series amplifiers, introduced into the UK by exclusive distributor, Sound Department, has been designed from the ground up, for use in fixed installations, club and mobile DJ work, AV rentals and MI/pro audio. The LT Series features Crest’s next generation Linear Power Supply combined with a Class D amplifier to deliver high output in an extremely compact package. The linear-toroid transformers are not as large or as heavy as traditional linear supplies since they are coupled with a new Class D output stage which is 93% efficient. The LT Series performs consistently during the most demanding situations, delivering immense power without sonic compromise. All LT Series amplifiers have a frequency response of 10 Hz-20 kHz with THD less than 0.05% at rated power. The full line up includes: LT1000 (500 w/ch @ 4 ohms); LT1500 (750 w/ch @ 4 ohms); LT2000 (1000 w/ch @ 4 ohms).

 
 
Fred Bentham
Monday, 14 May 2001

Industry veteran Fred Bentham died on Thursday 10 May at the age of 90. Though his career was long and distinguished, he will probably be remembered most for his ground-breaking work on the Strand Light Console which he designed to run a light show at the 1932 Ideal Home Exhibition. Unlike the control desks of today, the desk was designed to be 'played' like a piano. The funeral will take place on Thursday 24th May.

 
Adam Hall to Distribute Racklight in EuropeAdam Hall to Distribute Racklight in Europe
Monday, 14 May 2001

The Adam Hall group has announced its agreement with California-based RPM Optoelectronics to distribute RPM’s innovative new Racklight throughout Europe. Racklight represents a new dimension in glare-free directional focused lighting for rack cabinets. Technical advances incorporated in the ‘Racklight’ provide visually uniform, brilliant illumination unavailable in other products. The unique design of the UV-resistant acrylic light guide provides heat-free, concentrated light with no hot bulbs to handle or change, and is guaranteed for five years. Racklight illuminates one metre of rack space with cool, even light. Built with high quality materials around dependable solid state lighting, ‘Racklight’ is a safe and durable addition to any rack equipment, and is available in a variety of light source colours.

 
 
Salisbury City Hall Given Strand UpgradeSalisbury City Hall Given Strand Upgrade
Monday, 14 May 2001

An ongoing technical refurbishment at the Salisbury District Council-owned City Hall, which recently saw motorised hoists and rigging improvements bringing it up to Health & Safety standard, has now seen the venue upgrade to new Strand LD90 digital dimmer racks. While the previous analogue dimmer system sat exposed in the gallery, the conversion of a storage room has provided a dedicated area for the six new racks, which offer 144 channels of 2.5kW dimming (with RCD earth leakage breaker options on the power blocks). At the same time ten Strand SL 15/30 Zooms and eight Strand Cantata F soft-edge fresnel lanterns have been added to the lighting rig.

Work at the 953 (seated)-capacity concert venue was carried out by Edinburgh-based Northern Light, who successfully tendered for the specification prepared by technical consultants, Theatretech, and supplied all the Strand equipment. The Scottish company also wired the new DMX network which, according to the theatre¹s senior technician, Phil Manning, was long overdue. The next phase will see an upgrade to the in-house sound system when funds become available.

 
The Influence of Lighting
Sunday, 13 May 2001

Late March in London saw several industry organisations come together to contribute to an evening of presentations, the theme of which was Entertainment Lighting and its Influences. Members of the Society of Light & Lighting (SLL), the Institute of Lighting Engineers (ILE) and the Association of Lighting Designers (ALD) were present to hear several speakers outline their own particular experiences.

Peter Phillipson of Future Group Lighting Design talked about the differences between the disciplines of theatre and television lighting, compared to architectural lighting. To illustrate his point, he demonstrated the differences between a number of lighting fixtures. He also went on to discuss the critical role of the lighting programmer and introduced Stuart Porter, who had worked alongside LD Andrew Bridge on the production of Aida at the Royal Albert Hall. Dave Isherwood of The Moving Light Co, followed with a demonstration of moving lights outlining the benefits they can bring to a production.

PLASA’s Matthew Griffiths talked about the role of the Association and outlined a number of projects where entertainment lighting had been integrated into permanent installations, particularly benefiting educational establishments. Television lighting directors Duncan Brown and Warwick Fielding talked about the role of lighting in television, highlighting their presentations with reference to some of the many productions they have lit.

 
 
Empowerment on Display
Saturday, 12 May 2001

London-based Optimusic had an interesting demonstration of a potential application for their product at the Frankfurt ProLight & Sound exhibition in April.

Using just one of the company’s OptiBeam units (see L&SI January 2001), the demonstration featured a display window in a booth, in front of which a single light beam projected down onto a reflective floor-sticker. With the OptiBeam in reverse mode, anyone breaking this beam, intentionally or otherwise, triggers one of a pre-programmed sequence of cues, via MIDI.

Designed by Raymond Haeck of Optimusic’s Belgian distributor Demon, the display was a mock-up of a product showcase. The first cue activated the opaque grey LCD glass, revealing the product (a running shoe!) behind it; subsequent breaks of the beam started the product turning on a revolve, triggered a musical soundtrack, switched on a fan to create a backdrop of fluttering tinsel tassles, then changed the lighting states, and so on, before returning the display back to its original state. This was a simple, but effective, demonstration of how just one of these interactive light units can offer members of the public the power to alter their surroundings in retail, museums, themed attractions, leisure venues, and more.

Optimusic’s Mishka Klotz calls this ‘empowerment’ - placing the power in the hands of a usually passive audience. The levels of empowerment don’t stop there: up to 32 OptiBeam units can control up to 99 pre-programmed cues each - that’s a fair number of cues, just waiting to be created.

 
Celestion’s Permanent Mooring in Denmark
Friday, 11 May 2001

A Celestion CX system has been specified for one of Copenhagen’s most popular venues for private functions, the ‘Sealand’, an old ferry permanently moored in the heart of the city. This large vessel, capable of seating 700-800 people for dinner, is in demand for all kinds of private rentals, parties, concerts and fashion shows. Its proprietor Skanlines is jointly owned by the Danish and German governments. Musiktronic, the Copenhagen-based audio supplier, has recently kitted out the huge interior space of the ship with a new front-of-house PAsystem, featuring proprietary Musiktronic cabinets (all using Celestion drivers), and four delay channels, each using a pair of Celestion CX1220s. The system is controlled by a Yamaha 01V mixing console. The Sealand system has an unusual feature; the levels of both the front-of-house and the delay positions can be controlled from anywhere in the room, using wireless remote control.

 
 
Thompson Leaves Shoptick.com
Friday, 11 May 2001

Frances Thompson has announced that she is leaving the US-based production industry web venture, Shoptick.com. Launched last year, Shoptick.com offers ‘e-business for show business’ with production resources including online inventory tracking and project management, product and manufacturer listings and crew resources. Thompson, who previously worked for US truss manufacturer Tomcat, was responsible for marketing at Shoptick.com. She told PLASA Media that Shoptick.com was in the process of downsizing in order to concentrate heavily on product development. The company’s Kansas City staff will now handle marketing as well as continuing to provide the level of service already established.

 
Fineline Goes Heavy MetalFineline Goes Heavy Metal
Friday, 11 May 2001

Touring, festival and corporate event lighting rental house Fineline have become the first UK stockists of Tomcat’s new Extra Heavy Duty trussing. Fineline’s initial purchase of nearly 300ft of the super-strength truss was prompted by the demands of a recent event at Westpoint Arena in Exeter for Warwick Corporate Events, for which Fineline constructed a complete 80m x 30m x 11m high pitched-roof tented structure within the Westpoint venue - using the new trussing to form the topmost span of the apex. The 80m run of Extra Heavy Duty served as the main truss run. Below that, further out from the centre each side were two runs of lighter GP trussing (also Tomcat), and below these - still further out from the centre - were two runs of Trilite lightweight trussing, at a height of approximately 4m. All three layers of trussing were bridled together with additional runs of Trilite for rigidity and stability. The complete superstructure was suspended by 24 Lodestar motors, and Warwick Corporate Events dressed the entire ‘box’ with drapes and starcloths and Fineline installed an impressive moving light rig of Martin MAC 500s and 600s over the dining area, plus Golden Scans over the dancefloor. Lighting design was by @lighting.

Fineline is now adding a Tomcat ground support system with a 4 tonne per leg loading capacity to go with the trussing and into their rental stock. The ground support will be in action in Geneva for a huge corporate event in the summer that requires 80 ft spans with a centre load in excess of 1 tonne. Fineline’s Darren Wring ex

 
 
Navigator Hamper
Friday, 11 May 2001

Navigator Systems recently presented Pascale Lecomte of Britannia Row with a Harrods food hamper for taking part in a research and development project linked to the company’s Hire Track Eclipse rental management software. Britannia Row, which has been using Eclipse since 1999, was chosen at random from a number of companies who participated. Navigator will use the results from the findings to further develop the software.

 
Fourth Phase at White Cliffs of Dover
Friday, 11 May 2001

Fourth Phase Production Arts supplied a BP6 Gold Pani projector to artist Joanna Jones to realise her dramatic projected work on Dover’s famous white cliffs over the Easter weekend. The project was part of the Arts Council’s Year of The Artist initiative. Joanna’s idea was to combine the structures and textures of a cliff face with the structures and textures of a painted layer created by herself into a huge outdoor abstract painting. The painted layer was photographed as a 6 cm X 6 cm transparency by Ute Schendel which was then produced as a large format Cibachrome Pani slide by Wyatt Enever of DHA. Production Arts Emma Hutchison and Dominic Airs visited the site and ran a camera obscura to establish the lens needed, the exact size the artwork should be and the optimum positioning of the projector. They used a 22cm lens and a throw distance of 50 metres to produce a 35 metre square image. The projector was housed in a specially constructed enclosure for protection against adverse weather conditions and inquisitive members of the public. The projector was switched on before dusk at 7.30pm and off again at midnight when the site closed. At 5am, the site opened again and the projector was fired up so the painting could be seen going through its continuum of changes until it had dissolved completely, leaving only the naked cliff face in full daylight. This process could be seen from dusk on Good Friday until dawn on Easter Monday. The innovative idea proved an enormous success. People came from all over the South of England to see the projections and to enjoy

 
 
Federal Signal’s PA/VA Roadshow
Friday, 11 May 2001

Federal Signal, the leading supplier of public address and voice alarm (PA/VA) systems, is hosting a new summer roadshow to highlight the significance of British Standards for PA/VA systems. The initiative is aimed at consultants and specifiers from across the PA/VA and fire protection industry who need to know more about the issue of operating standards and why it is important to use systems with BS5839 compliance.

The guest speaker will be Doug Edworthy, formerly of Millbank Electronics and a leading expert in systems engineering, marketing and quality management. He has been running his own consultancy since 1994. Jason Hatswell, commerial sales manager at Federal Signal, said: "The road show will explain why British Standards are so important to those responsible for product specification, design and installation. We will also show Federal Signal’s equipment and explain how it complies with the standards."

The dates for the road show are as follows: 14 June, Federal Signal House, Macclesfield; 21 June, Birmingham Metropole Hotel; 26 June, London Swallow Hotel; 5 July, Newcastle Malmaison Hotel. For more information, telephone +44 (0)1625 666600.

 
James Thomas Launches Image Plus for MR16
Friday, 11 May 2001

James Thomas Engineering, the company that has put the MR16 ‘Birdie’ lantern on the map, introduces the latest evolution for the Par 16 lantern - the Image Plus. Image Plus is a simple and cost-effective focussing device that attaches to the lantern’s colour frame runners, further increasing the versatility of the lantern. The Image Plus 3 takes a standard size E Gobo, enabling any desired image or logo - in either glass or metal - to be projected onto a surface or wall up to four metres away. James Thomas also offers an MR16 gobo rotator that will rotate one or two gobos. Two types of lens are available - for narrow or wide effect options. There’s also a set of four shutters for beam-shaping and masking of the projected image. For the sharpest focus, lamp types required are either E49 or EXT, both of which are 12V, 50W, the Osram Titan 12V/65W or the EYF 12V/75W.

Any situations requiring precise focussing of the lightsource will find this fitting ideal. The Image Plus and other attachments are suitable for a wide variety of applications including theatres, retail, architectural, museums, heritage centres and art galleries. James Thomas Engineering manufactures an assortment of Par 16 lanterns which house MR16 lamps, including the standard type and those fitted with remote torroidal transformers either above the yoke or to the side, with a dimmable electronic transformer up to 12V/75W.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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